First Green Deal plans make barely a ripple

The news that only four Green Deal plans had been signed by late June 2013, with a further 241 plans lodged, seems to have been received with a lack of concern by Greg Barker, Minister for Energy & Climate Change. He said, ‘The Green Deal is an ambitious and uniquely long-term programme designed to upgrade the energy efficiency of Britain’s homes. It’s only just getting started, but the early signs are encouraging.’

In a statement, he referred to 81 798 installations supported by the Energy Company Obligation, helping those most in need or with properties that are particularly hard to treat. He also referred to 38 259 Green Deal assessments as a ‘clear sign that consumers genuinely want to make their homes more efficient’. Greg Barker also said, ‘78% of people who have received a Green Deal advice report said they had, were getting or would get energy-saving measures installed.’

One difficulty is access to finance. Towards the end of June there were five Green Deal finance providers, with up to 50 expected to be active by the end of the year.

Support for Greg Barker came from Paul Joyner, director of sustainable building solutions, part of the Travis Perkins Group, in a speech to the Green Building Council.

Mr Joyner identified access to finance as the key problem and indicated that Travis Perkins Group and Green Deal provider Toriga were working towards an autumn date. He said, ‘I am confident that once finance is in place, the Green Deal will really take off.’

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