Xpelair breathes new life into London’s classic architecture

Xpelair, heat recovery ventilation
Formerly an ambassadorial residence, The Lancasters in central London has been converted into prime residential living with its ventilation requirements met using Xpelair MVHR units.

Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for the refurbishment of heritage property overlooking London’s Hyde Park into prime residential accommodation is provided by Xcell 400 units from Xpelair Ventilation Solutions. The systems for The Lancasters Grade 2 listed building in French Renaissance style were specified by Mecserve Consulting Engineers. The project involved converting the building into 77 grand apartments.

Clifton Gordon, Xpelair’s national business-development manager, comments, ‘This is an extremely prestigious project restoring an ambassadorial resident that dates back to the mid-1800s to its former glory. Behind the retained 27 m-high Victorian facade will be state-of-the-art lateral and duplex apartments that will set new standards in residential landmark living — complete with finely wrought balconies, 4.8 m-high ceilings and fantastic views across Hyde Park.’

Because of the size of the apartments, two or three ventilation units have been installed to handle the required air volumes.

Ideal for larger properties, Xcell 400 offers performance levels of 400 m3/h at 150 Pa and has a 90% efficient heat-recovery cell that keeps incoming and outgoing air flows separate.

These units have UltraDC motors that are designed for continuous operation, long life, low noise and exceptionally low running costs. Outlet spigots can be vertical or horizontal, and the two G3 cell pre-filters are user accessible from outside without have to isolate the unit.

For more information on this story, click here: December 2011, 100
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