Wiring accessories meet disability needs in new business park

wiring
Providing good visibility and ease of operation to help meet the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act is Eaton’s COPA range with clip-on face plates in a variety of colours.
Eaton wiring accessories with clip-on plates have been installed at a major business park in south east London to meet disability requirements. Contractor 21st Century Contract Services needed to find a cost-effective range of switches and socket outlets to meet the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act in 24 industrial units on the Crossways Business Park in Dartford and chose Eaton’s new COPA range after looking at products from several manufacturers. This range of accessories is offered with a choice of different-coloured clip-on face plates to conceal the fixing screws. COPA accessories with a grey face plate were presented to the client, who readily accepted the solution. The grey plates stand out against the light colour of the walls, while the white moulded rockers are easily located. The price difference between these and traditional moulded accessories was significantly less than for other accessories considered. Other benefits highlighted by Stephan Halls, project manger with 21st Century, include being able to paint the walls without the face plates fixed, avoiding getting paint on them The plates were clipped on shortly before handover. The face plates can be changed to a different colour whenever required.
Related links:



modbs tv logo

Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) Smart Check launched to boost competence and fight fraud

Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) has developed a ‘Smart Check’ app to help construction site operators verify the identities and qualifications of more than two million skills card holders. 

MBS attends the BESA launch of ‘safe havens’ blueprint for air quality

The Building Engineering Services Association (BESA) has completed its trilogy of free guides designed to help building owners and managers turn their buildings into ‘safe havens’ that protect occupants from health risks linked to airborne contaminants and viruses.