Shape up to energy ratings of buildings with free guide

Mitsubishi
Guidance on building energy ratings can be downloaded from the web site of Mitsubishi Electric.
To help those involve in the industry to find their way around the building-certification process and likely future legislation, environmental-control specialist Mitsubishi Electric has produced a free, independent guide to Building Energy Ratings. Over the next decade, the company believes that the introduction of energy performance certificates and continued hikes in energy costs will increase occupiers’ knowledge of, and demand for, property that is more environmentally efficient. Commercial director Donald Daw says, ‘There is growing concern that organisations will not want to occupy high-energy-use buildings which will damage their environmental credentials. ‘The equipment in the average commercial office building is going to come under much closer scrutiny than it ever has, and facilities managers are going to be kept very busy over the next few years.’ The guide draws attention to survey results from Gensler architects and consultants in 2006, which show that 75% of architects and consultants in property development believe that energy labelling will decrease the value and transferability of their existing building stock. There is also growing concern among the majority that some properties are valuation time bombs that will receive low ratings because of poor investment in improving energy performance. A copy of the guide can be downloaded from Mitsubishi Electric’s web site in the section on tools and resources. It takes a bit of finding, but the pdf file is called ‘Building energy ratings’.
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