Benefiting from a Display Energy Certificate

CIBSE Awards
Recommendations accompanying the Display Energy Certificate prepared by Andrew Gardner for the Sheffield Park Hotel offer the potential to achieve a better next certificate.

When the energy consumption of a building is analysed to prepare a Display Energy Certificate, recommendations to reduce energy consumption in the future are made. A host of recommendations were made by low-carbon energy assessor Andrew Gardner of CCL Consulting for the Sheffield Park Hotel, winning for him one of the CIBSE Low Carbon Performance Awards.

So what recommendations might accompany a DEC? This winning entry include the following.

• Introducing variable-speed drives.
• Engaging with building users to reduce the energy consumed by equipment.
• Reducing the use of hot water.
• Key-card control for lights and air conditioning in function rooms. 
• A kitchen energy plan.

The kitchen energy plan gave the client an immediate energy tool with which to educate staff on energy usage and reduction. The plan identified equipment with a high energy use and made clear to staff the financial cost and CO2 emissions. A simple traffic-light colour code identified items with high energy costs and emissions.

For example, staff were made aware that switching on the deep-fat fryer an hour earlier than required would cost £5.32 and emit over 23 kg of CO2. This knowledge led to staff switching off such equipment when not required and switch them on only when required.

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