Indoor air quality as an environmental issue

Stories about absenteeism from work abound in broadcast news bulletins and in newspapers. The cost to business of that absenteeism is apparently known right down to the last pound, but the reasons are less understood. News journalists love health issues that might be the cause of such absenteeism, but they generally seem much less concerned about the boring details of putting things right. In buildings, providing a healthy environment is the remit of the building-services sector, one aspect of which is covered in the feature on indoor air quality in this issue of Modern Building Services. In fully appreciating their responsibilities, engineers should bear in mind the World Health Organisation’s definition of health as ‘a state of complete well-being and not merely the absence of disease’. The coughing, dry throat, sore eyes etc. that are associated with poor indoor air quality and sick building syndrome could hardly be regarded as diseases, but they certainly detract from a sense of complete well-being. Our feature provides much food for thought on the factors that are associated with a poor environment in buildings and how they can be addressed. There is no doubt that people are far more demanding about the quality of their working environment than they ever used to be. Unfortunately, many buildings are still unhealthy, ventilation is poor in many buildings, and air quality is worse than it should be.



modbs tv logo

Grenfell is the building industry's Piper Alpha says CIBSE

The recent passage of the Building Safety Act is a welcome recognition of the fact that making safe buildings is a highly skilled operation says the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, endorsing the need for more effective regulation and a profound change in culture.

Underlying project-starts uptick indicates gradual recovery, Glenigan data suggests

  • 13% rise in detailed planning approvals against the preceding three months
  • 18% decline in main contract awards against the previous year
  • 9% increase in underlying starts during the three months to May

Glenigan has released the June 2022 edition of its Construction Review.