Next-day degree-data is based on half-hourly measurements

Stark has made its Day+1 degree-data freely available through its web site. The use of degree-day data in analysing weather-related energy consumption is an essential part of any energy-management programme. Stark’s degree-day date is based on half-hourly temperature readings and calculated from the previous day’s data. Until now, according to the company, most published degree-day data has been based on a single monthly value made available over a month later.

To capture its degree-day data, Stark has divided the UK into 90 localised zones, instead of the current 18 regional zones. Data is collected from 300 temperature sensors, most of which are in urban and suburban areas. There are three sets of base temperatures for cooling degree days and three sets for heating degree days, rather than the single base temperature of 15.5°C provided by most degree-day data.

The CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme brings a greater need for better forecasting models for energy consumption.

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