A matter of taste for groundbreaking heat pump air curtain

Madison restaurant, London, heat pump, air curtain, heating, cooling, Toshiba, Fred Shaw & Co Ltd

Madison restaurant at St Paul’s in London is the first venue in the UK to install a ground-breaking new heat pump-based air curtain, which provides high efficiency heating and cooling.

The restaurant wanted to deliver a high-quality indoor environment for customers, while ensuring low energy and servicing costs. The air curtain provides a high velocity continuous down-draft of air, creating an invisible barrier that maintains internal comfort conditions.

It is connected to the restaurant’s Toshiba Super Modular Multi System (SMMS-e) VRF air conditioning system, enabling it to benefit from its high performance, low energy heating and cooling. Following a site survey by Toshiba’s technical staff, the system was installed by Chapman’s Refrigeration Limited. The colour-coded casing was matched to the customer’s RAL code, ensuring it blends in perfectly with its surroundings.

The air curtain was developed by Fred Shaw & Co Ltd and engineers from Toshiba Air Conditioning UK specifically to meet UK requirements. It was subjected to a battery of live tests at BSRIA’s laboratories in Bracknell to evaluate its thermal efficiency, acoustic and air-flow performance under internationally-recognised test conditions. The results prove the technology meets the performance requirements of the UK government-backed Energy Technology List (ETL) for air curtains, and it has been accepted onto the scheme. This gives end users an enhanced capital allowance on the purchase of ETL-listed equipment.

For more information on this story, click here: April 2018, 124
Related links:
Related articles:



modbs tv logo

Grenfell is the building industry's Piper Alpha says CIBSE

The recent passage of the Building Safety Act is a welcome recognition of the fact that making safe buildings is a highly skilled operation says the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, endorsing the need for more effective regulation and a profound change in culture.

Underlying project-starts uptick indicates gradual recovery, Glenigan data suggests

  • 13% rise in detailed planning approvals against the preceding three months
  • 18% decline in main contract awards against the previous year
  • 9% increase in underlying starts during the three months to May

Glenigan has released the June 2022 edition of its Construction Review.