SIG enjoys better light and lower energy use

controls, BMS, BEMS, Riegens, lighting
Huge savings in energy are being made in SIG warehouses by replacing SON lighting with Riegens T5 luminaires with daylight and occupancy control.

The replacement of uncontrolled high-pressure-sodium lighting (SON) in SIG warehouses with Riegens HB Saleni controllable T5 fluorescent luminaires is achieving average energy savings of 65 to 70%. SIG is a leading distributor of specialist building products and worked with the Carbon Trust to evaluate the energy performance of all its 320 premises in the UK. SON lighting in warehouses was identified as an area for improvement.

The new lighting improves light levels and quality and provides control opportunities that were not possible with the SON lighting.

SIG’s energy manager Dave Haydock explains, We identified the branches that would offer the maximum return on investment and prioritised these in our roll-out upgrade programme. We also set a maximum payback period of five years, with an expectation of achieving 65 to 70% savings on lighting costs.’

Significantly better performance was achieved at Plymouth, with a 79% saving giving a 2-year payback. The number of luminaires was reduced from 80 to 68, while maintaining comparable lighting levels. Dave Haydock says, ‘We’ve has a positive response from the staff and been very pleased with the support we’ve received from Riegens.’

Plymouth is one of six sites that have been upgraded so far. High-bay sensors enable lighting to be controlled in response to daylight levels and occupancy to maximise energy savings.

For more information on this story, click here: February 2013, 82
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