Remeha replaces 43-year-old boilers

Remeha, boiler, space heating, maintenance, refurbishment

Energy savings of 20 to 25% are expected following the installation of five Remeha boilers as part of a major refurbishment of the heating plant serving the Civic Centre complex of Oldham Council. The key requirements for the council when replacing the 43-year-old failing boilers were to improve the reliability of the heating service and reduce operating costs.

The original LTHW plant was in the basement plant room. A survey revealed that the mild-steel flues that had been built into the building during construction has deteriorated to the point of becoming dangerous. Due to structural, planning and financial constraints, the decision was taken to decentralise the boiler plant.

The new plant rooms are in two internal car parks, which presented a number of challenges for the specifier Unity Partnership.

John Schofield, senior mechanical engineer with Unity, explained, ‘Flueing, delivery access and positioning of new plant, as well as distribution of the services to serve the existing sub plant rooms all had to be addressed.

‘Size, ease of installation and manoeuvrability were important considerations in specifying the boiler’s. Added to this was the need for improved efficiency and reliability. We specified Remeha Gas 310/610 Eco Pro condensing boilers as they meet all of these requirements.’

Four Gas 310 10-section Eco Pro boilers were installed in the plant room serving the Civic Centre (pictured), with one Gas 610 10-section Eco Pro boiler in the plant room serving the Queen Elizabeth Hall.

The contractor was Steve Barton of WH Good.

For more information on this story, click here: July 2017, 86
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