Oventrop valves for university engineering building in Ireland

pipe, pipework, Oventrop,valves, DHW, Commissioning
This new engineering building at an Irish University enjoys the benefits of Oventrop valves in its heating and hot-water systems.

The hot-water and heating systems of the new engineering building at Galway of the National University of Ireland benefit from the use of a range of Oventrop valves. They provide thermostatic control of temperature and flow in the hot-water system and have significantly reduced commissioning time. The valves include differential-pressure regulating and Aquastrom T Plus hot-water service valves.

The building brings together the five engineering faculties from 13 separate locations across campus into a single facility accommodating over 1100 students.

The Aquastrom valves were factory set at 57°C, and no commissioning was required on site. These valves are installed in the return of a recirculation system and throttle down to a residual minimum flow to limit heat loss once the system reaches temperature. As the system cools, the valve allows more flow, eliminating cold dead legs and the risk of legionella.

Oventrop AV6 valves have been installed so the water flow can be regulated to match the required heat output of radiators, saving energy at source.

This 14 250 m2 engineering building is a teaching tool in itself, with its construction details displayed externally. On view is large-scale rainwater harvesting and a biomass boiler.

Services pipes and ductwork are exposed and labelled, with live data streamed form a variety of sensors to monitor the energy consumption of the building.

For more information on this story, click here: February 2013, 111
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