High-intensity LEDs transform the voltage test lamp

Martindale Electric, electrical testing, voltage test lamp

The latest generation of Drummond test lamps from Martindale Electric use high-intensity LEDs for live-voltage indication. Using high-intensity LEDs is said to transform the test lamp by enabling the display of discrete voltages over a 360° viewing angle, even in bright light. Four distinctive bands of LED illumination indicate voltages above 50, 100, 200 and 400 V — rather than trying to judge voltage by lamp brightness.

These discrete voltage levels allow accurate identification of potentially lethal voltages and enable electrical professionals to distinguish between 110 V, 230 V and phase-to-phase voltages in a 3-phase system.

There are two versions — the MTL10 and the MTL20. A finger shield protects against accidental contact with a live conductor, and insulated probe tips leave only 4 mm of exposed metal.

For difficult applications where access is limited, the detachable probes can be replaced with right-angles or straight probes from 3 to 13 cm long. These probes can be rotated and locked in place, providing easy access to measurement points in crowded cabinets.

The MTL20 has two test buttons — one on the body of the unit and one on the probe. Depressing both switches at once presents a low impedance to the circuit under test, enabling the test lamp to draw a high current and dissipate phantom voltages — making it easy to differentiate between phantom voltages due to capacitive coupling and true hazardous voltages.

These voltage testers can be purchased separately or as part of a kit that includes a proving unit and a carry case.

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